Herbs on the Hill - Handmade, Naturally

Kate Bartram Williams
Herbs on the Hill. Kate Bartram Williams Perhaps Kate shares the spirit of her ancestor John Bartram, the 18th Century plant finder and herbalist to royalty, but whatever the inspiration, in just a few short years her vision of Herbs on the Hill has blossomed.  For over 15yrs her company ethos has remained the same as when she first began making and selling her products; never compromise in providing customers with the highest quality, pure, 100% natural and hand-made products that we can.Perhaps Kate shares the spirit of her ancestor John Bartram, the 18th Century plant finder and herbalist to royalty, but whatever the inspiration, in just a few short years her vision of Herbs on the Hill has blossomed.

For 18 yrs her ethos has remained the same as when she first began making and selling her products; never compromise in providing customers with the highest quality, pure, 100% natural and hand-made products that we can.

The Bartram name is as well known today as it has been throughout history in the Herbal and Horticultural World. If you are interested check out these links ¸.✿´´¯`•.¸¸. ི♥ྀ.

Herbs on the Hill. John Bartram (1699-1777) was called the
John Bartram (1699-1777) was called the "greatest natural botanist in the world" by Carl Linnaeus. He and his son William travelled North America, collecting, exploring, discovering and preserving all forms of nature.

Herbs on the Hill. William Bartram (1739 – 1823) was an American naturalist. The son of John Bartram, William Bartram As a boy, he accompanied his father on many of his travels, to the Catskill Mountains, the New Jersey Pine Barrens, New England, and Florida. From his mid-teens, Bartram was noted for the quality of his botanic and ornithological drawings. He also had an increasing role in the maintenance of his father's botanic garden, and added many rare species to it.  William Bartram (1739 – 1823) was an American naturalist. The son of John Bartram, William Bartram As a boy, he accompanied his father on many of his travels, to the Catskill Mountains, the New Jersey Pine Barrens, New England, and Florida. From his mid-teens, Bartram was noted for the quality of his botanic and ornithological drawings. He also had an increasing role in the maintenance of his father's botanic garden, and added many rare species to it.


Herbs on the Hill. Bartram's Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine  Thomas Bartram Containing over 900 entries of general disease conditions and corresponding herbal treatments, this book covers: therapeutic action, 550 monographs of medicinal plants, and the properties of herbs and preparations such as tinctures, liquid extracts, poultices and essential oils.Bartram's Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine

Thomas Bartram
Containing over 900 entries of general disease conditions and corresponding herbal treatments, this book covers: therapeutic action, 550 monographs of medicinal plants, and the properties of herbs and preparations such as tinctures, liquid extracts, poultices and essential oils.



Herbs on the Hill. Bartrams Garden logo “…the Botanick fire set me in such A flame as is not to be quenched untill death or I explore most of the South western vegitative treasures in North. America.” John Bartram 1761.  The John Bartram Association’s mission is to protect and enhance the landmark Bartram’s Garden and House, advance the Bartram legacy of discovery, gardening and art, and inspire audiences of all ages to care for the natural world.   The Garden is a 45-acre National Historic Landmark is operated by the Association in cooperation with the City of Philadelphia.     “…the Botanick fire set me in such A flame as is not to be quenched untill death or I explore most of the South western vegitative treasures in North. America.”
John Bartram 1761.

The John Bartram Association’s mission is to protect and enhance the landmark Bartram’s Garden and House, advance the Bartram legacy of discovery, gardening and art, and inspire audiences of all ages to care for the natural world.   The Garden is a 45-acre National Historic Landmark is operated by the Association in cooperation with the City of Philadelphia.
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